17th Karmapa critical of China, hopeful for Tibet, fully with Dalai Lama

May 20, 2014 12:52 pm0 commentsViews: 196

(TibetanReview.net, Apr04, 2014) The 17th Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje, the head of the dominant Karma Kagyu lineage within the Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism, considers it quite possible that the political situation in China will change considerably, resulting in a rethink on the Tibetan issue within the Chinese Communist Party. Speaking in an interview with the Economic Times in India’s capital New Delhi, he has criticized Communist China’s totalitarian regime, described Tibet as an independent country since ancient times, right up to 1951, and expressed total commitment to and support for the Dalai Lama’s middle way approach of seeking an autonomous rule for Tibet under Chinese rule.

Describing the Dalai Lama as his spiritual and temporal leader and one who has been like a father-figure for him in Dharamsala, the Karmapa has said, “I unequivocally support for the ‘Middle way approach’ advocated by the Dalai Lama.”

The Karmapa, who arrived in India in the beginning of 2000 after a dramatic escape from Chinese ruled Tibet when he was 14, has described India as his second home. “India has not only saved Tibetans and their way of life from extinction but also enabled us to draw inspiration from this holy land of the Buddha and take Buddhism to distant parts of the world,” economictimes.indiatimes.com Apr 3 quoted him as saying.

Although India has so far not permitted him to visit or take up residence at his exile headquarters at Rumtek in the state of Sikkim, due to an ongoing dispute, he has said, “I have nothing but gratitude for Government of India since my arrival.”

He has referred to the strong religious, cultural and trade ties that had traditionally existed between independent Tibet and India, and to the fact that the common border between them was open and peaceful, allowing not only the free movement of goods and people but also the flow of some of the finest thoughts of human civilization.

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